You are hereLecture Series 2010-2011 - "Illuminating Dark Matter" by Neal Weiner

Lecture Series 2010-2011 - "Illuminating Dark Matter" by Neal Weiner


 

Friday, February 4, 2011

 

      Neal Weiner, associate professor in the Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics (CCPP) in the physics department of NYU, will address the AAA on Friday, February 4 on “Illuminating Dark Matter.” The free public lecture beings at 6:15 p. m. in the Kaufmann Theater of the AMNH.

     The CCCP is a group of faculty, students and research scientists working on fundamental questions at the intersection of particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

     Weiner’s abstract of the lecture is as follows: “One of the central discoveries of modern cosmology is that the universe is dominated by something other than us. More specifically, that the matter that makes up everything we know (protons, neutrons, electrons) is just a
tiny fraction of the mass of the universe. The remainder is dark matter and dark energy. While we know it’s there, we’re ignorant as to what it is. Some experiments have attempted to find it, by looking for rare processes deep underground, or at cosmic rays in space, but rather than clarifying the situation, the results have been increasingly confusing. I will describe our current attempts to understand the dark universe, both theoretically and experimentally, and what we might find out in the coming years.”

     Weiner has broad interests in particle physics and cosmology. His focus is on physics beyond the standard model. In this broad field, his work has included studies of extra dimensional theories (large, small, warped and flat), supersymmetry, grand unification, flavor, neutrino mass, dark matter, inflation and dark energy, as well as relationships between the different subjects. 

     Weiner was a post doc at the University of Washington prior to joining the CCPP in 2004. He is a graduate of Carleton College and received his Ph.D. in physics at UC Berkeley. Weiner is currently on sabbatical leave at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N. J.